21 Excuses People Have for Not Eating Their Fruits & Veggies

My journey into veganism began in 1987 through 1989.  In 1987 I gave up read meat; in 1988 I gave up chicken; on January 1, 1989 I gave up seafood and dairy.  Lo and behold, since 25 years of age I’ve been vegan.  Honestly, there was no intent on becoming vegan because I didn’t know what the word meant back then.  I just felt it was a good idea to stop eating meat products for superior health.  It was the best decision I’ve ever made.

Just in case you may be teetering on the edge regarding whether to dive into a plant-based eating style (veganism), following are the top twenty excuses I hear all the time.  If you are using any of them, it is time to wake up and get a grip on your life.  These excuses are excerpted from The 1st Aisle:  How to Eat for Maximum Health available on Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/author/kirkcharles).

  1. I’ll get started after the holidays. Understand that during the holiday season is when you must be most focused.  The only problem is that there is always a holiday around the corner; and let us not forget about birthdays and special occasions.  You must get started before the holidays, not after the holidays.
  2. I eat healthy. This is really an indirect excuse born from arrogance.  Saying you “eat healthy” usually means you follow all the “scientific” rules and fads of good health.  This excuse really says, “I know it all about what to eat.”  Unfortunately, that means you are mentally blocked from absorbing anything more than what you think you know.   The bottom line is 99% of people who use this excuse are not in the best of shape.
  3. I need protein. This excuse displays complete ignorance of what was put in the Garden of Eden and what composes plants.  Protein is in every living thing—including plants—and there is more than enough to sustain a high-quality life.  And, you can build muscle too!
  4. I don’t know what to eat. This one is complete denial and disrespect for the plant world.  You are just saying you are unwilling to enjoy a simple salad or piece of fruit.  Go to your nearest grocery store and hang out in the first aisle for an hour.  Then go buy a vegan cookbook.  You will figure out what to eat when your belly growls.
  5. It’s all genetics. This is a cynical viewpoint and relieves you of responsibility.  It assumes one is powerless when the power of choice is all we need to make a difference.  Your wellbeing is determined by how you allow your genes to be expressed through eating and activity.
  6. I like to eat.  This is complete inanity.  Doesn’t everyone like to eat?  (Actually I know some people who say they don’t.)  It assumes enjoyable eating is only possible by consuming what the average American eats.  By reading this far you are obviously above average in your desire to try this approach.  Putting any and everything in your body is never a sound strategy.
  7. I’ll have to chew too much. I’ve never understood this one, especially from those who like to eat.  Herbivores need to chew their food because it begins the digestive process.  Do you want to swallow your food whole to save time?  It’s totally ridiculous.
  8. I’m not disciplined. The “woe is me excuse.”  Give it a break.  You are just not incentivized.  This type of excuse can change quickly when the doctor gives you the “or else” speech.  It is best to “man up” and make a preemptive strike before that happens.
  9. I’ll just work it off at the gym. This one is scary because on the surface it makes total sense.  The problem is that it gives you license to eat anything because all you must do is sweat enough and the pounds melt away.  However, there ain’t that much “workin’ it off” in the world for most people.  It is too time consuming and too stressful on the body.  We must “melt it off” through effective eating.
  10. I grew up eating this way. Don’t blame your family.  I grew up sipping my grandmother’s beer!  Does that make it the best thing to do?  Dangerous eating can become so ingrained in your lifestyle that you disregard what is dangerous.  It is senseless and sets you up for failure.  We all must mature out of our noxious eating habits and move in a new direction.
  11. It’s impossible to eat healthy when you travel a lot. Absolutely ridiculous.  At most major airports there are vegetable options.  Most Asian restaurants in airports (Thai, Chinese, Japanese) have steamed and/or sautéed dishes for your delight.  You can even take food on the plane for longer flights.  If you travel by car, pack your food before you leave or pull over to the side of the road at a salad bar.
  12. I’m too busy to eat healthy. Better eating habits do not take any more time than bad eating habits.  All you must do is develop new eating patterns, which will require some discipline.  We all have 24 hours, but some of us use that time more wisely than others.  It all depends on what is most important to you.
  13. Eating healthy is not convenient. Cheap, fast food is much more convenient because it is cheap and fast—but it is not real food.  It is processed and proliferates life-threatening ailments.  All you must do is take food with you on your journeys and do not succumb to what is advertised.
  14. It’s too expensive to eat healthy.  This one seems to be true, but it does not fly, unless you are at the lowest income level.  Eating healthier and cheaper than the standard American diet is easier when you cook your own food and shop wisely, especially if you are eating a high percentage of fruit and veggies.  There are many great options in the first aisle of the grocery store, as well as the beans and rice aisle, which are less than $1.99 per pound.
  15. My family will not accept it. Whether your family accepts it or not, you must look out for yourself.  They will not be able to help you when you are saddled with high blood pressure, high cholesterol or type 2 diabetes, so you must forge your own way.  Your family will accept it and cheer you on once you produce positive results.
  16. There’s nothing healthy on the menu. Poppycock!  I’ve heard this one too many times.  If so, ask for a special order.  Many chefs would love to make something special for you.  If not, find a new place to eat.
  17. I’ll eat too many carbs. This implies a total misconception of what carbs are.  Many people overload on the bread and pasta when going vegan, which are the problem carbs.  But the carbs deriving from fruits and vegetables are your greatest asset.  We desperately need those carbs for superior metabolic functioning.
  18. Vegetables make me gassy. Got it, no one wants to fart all day, but your gut bacteria thrives off of fiber and non-digestible starches.  Once it gets used to having a consistent dose of it, through fruits and vegetables, much of the gassiness will subside.  And your farts probably won’t smell as bad as they did when you were a meat eater.
  19. There are too many pesticides on fruits and veggies. Agreed, there are too many pesticides in our society.  But, those fruits and veggies sprayed with pesticides are still far superior to processed foods, which can be drowned in preservatives and additives on top of pesticides.  When you can, buy organically grown fruits and veggies.
  20. Taking vitamin and mineral supplements is better than eating fruits and veggies. So untrue.  In recent studies many supplements have been shown to be ineffective and possibly harmful.  This could be due to most of them being synthetically produced in laboratories.  Also, many don’t absorb unless they work in concert with the many other phytonutrients naturally occurring in plants.
  21. Veggies aren’t a complete protein source. The “complete protein” argument is a nonsensical.  Veggies provide all the essential amino acids humans need.  Even if they didn’t, who would only eat one food to get all essential amino acids?

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